Installation view.

Installation view.

 

Installation view.

Garage / Tool Shed - Doe, 2014. Lego, Ikea trestle with shelf and plant.

Smorboll, 2014. Lego.

Upstairs Living Room – Tortoise, 2014. Lego, Ikea coffee table and plant.

Fejka, 2014. Lego.

 

Hallway / Rear Entrance – Snake, 2014. Lego, Ikea shelf with drawers and plant.

 

Bedroom 3, Baby’s Room – Lion, 2014. Lego, Ikea changing table, change mat and plants.

LEGO animals, Ikea Furniture

Downstairs Dining Room - Octopus, 2014. Lego, Ikea chair and plant with hanger.

LEGO animals, Ikea Furniture

Alslev, 2014. Lego

 

LEGO animals, Ikea Furniture

Vinager, 2014. Lego.

LEGO animals, Ikea Furniture

Downstairs Entertainment Area – Manta Ray, 2014. Lego, Ikea bathroom shelves, light and terrarium.

LEGO animals, Ikea Furniture

Kitchen / Pantry – Seal, 2014. Lego, Ikea foot stool and plant.

LEGO animals, Ikea Furniture

Rampen, 2014. Lego.

LEGO animals, Ikea Furniture

Kitchenette – Dolphin, 2014. Lego, Ikea shelf and plan.

LEGO animals, Ikea Furniture

Upstairs Study – Penguin, 2014. Lego, Ikea chair and plant with hanger.

 

LEGO animals, Ikea Furniture

Breakfast Bar / Kitchen – Chimpanzee, 2011. Lego, Ikea bar stool and plant.

 

LEGO animals, Ikea Furniture

Master Bedroom – Deer, 2014. Lego, Ikea chairs, drawing paper roll and plant.

Venereal Architecture, 2014


“Our exhibition, Venereal Architecture, is about the spaces we inhabit. As humans we are forever adapting and manipulating our environment to cope with the elements and creatures that share our spaces. We build structures that enclose and protect us from nature. Air conditioning controls the temperature and we domesticate animals so they can live with us.

Our control over nature (or lack there of) is central to this body of work. Lego and Ikea furniture are very similar in a sense: they are both objects of aspiration that require assembly. Lego, which we grew up with, represents the dreams and fantasies of a child; Ikea furniture, which has become so ubiquitous, represents the dreams and fantasies of an adult. By meshing these two objects together we can think about the gap between our fantastic dreams and our banal longings. Both products represent destruction and re-construction, which are concerns we revisit continually within our practice.

The wall works act as a counterpoint to a possible reading of the sculptural works as a simple man/nature dichotomy. The works represent our sublimated animal urges expressed through shopping. The Lego wall works are based on found screen shots from pornos that utilise Ikea furniture within their set design. The ubiquity and relative economy of Ikea furniture means that it was inevitable that the furniture should share the screen with actors in low budget skin flicks.

We believe that the combination of Ikea and sex is palpable. Visiting an Ikea showroom is a serious group-nesting experience: like giant bower birds, we carry around our blue object bag in the vague hope of getting laid if we curate the right combination of objects into our love-nests. The consumer experience must be the result of some natural urge gone slightly wrong”.


Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro, 2014